quotes with the word "paine"
Letter to Pamela Clemens Moffet, in Albert Bigelow Paine, Mark Twain's Letters: Arranged with Comment (1917), Vol. 1
Mark Twain      1869-11-09  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
Draft manuscript (c.1881), quoted by Albert Bigelow Paine in Mark Twain: A Biography (1912).
Mark Twain      1881  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
"Consistency", paper read at the Hartford Monday Evening Club on 5 December 1887. The Complete Essays of Mark Twain, p. 582 (First published in the 1923 edition of Mark Twain's Speeches, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine, pp. 120-130, where it is incorrectly dated "following the Blaine-Cleveland campaign, 1884." (See Mark Twain's Notebooks & Journals (1979), ed. Frederick Anderson, Vol. 3, p. 41, footnote 92) Many reprints repeat Paine's dating.)
Mark Twain      1887  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
Letter to William Dean Howells, 27 February 1885, in Albert Bigelow Paine, Mark Twain's letters: Arranged with Comment (1917), Vol. 2, p. 450
Mark Twain      1885  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
Notebook entry, January or February 1894, Mark Twain's Notebook, ed. Albert Bigelow Paine (1935), p. 240.
Mark Twain      1894  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
Marginal note in Moncure D. Conway's Sacred Anthologyquoted by Albert Bigelow Paine in Mark Twain: A Biography (1912).
Mark Twain      Date: unknown  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
Misattributed Motto of United States Magazine and Democratic Review. First used in introductory essay by editor John L. O'Sullivan in the premier issue (October, 1837, p. 6). Attributed to Jefferson by Henry David Thoreau, this statement is cited in his essay on civil disobedience, but the quote has not been found in Jefferson's own writings. It is also commonly attributed to Thomas Paine, perhaps because of its similarity in theme to many of his well-documented expressions such as "Society in every state is a blessing, but government even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one."Variant: That government is best which governs least.
Thomas Jefferson      Date: unknown  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
draft manuscript (c.1881), quoted by Albert Bigelow Paine in Mark Twain: A Biography (1912).
Mark Twain      Date: unknown  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
Oh, dear me, how unspeakably funny and owlishly idiotic and grotesque was that "plagiarism" farce! As if there was much of anything in any human utterance, oral or written, except plagiarism! The kernal, the soul - let us go further and say the substance, the bulk, the actual and valuable material of all human utterances'- is plagiarism. For substantially all ideas are second-hand, consciously and unconsciously drawn from a million outside sources, and daily used by the garnerer with a pride and satisfaction born of the superstition that he originated them; whereas there is not a rag of originality about them anywhere except the little discoloration they get from his mental and moral calibre and his temperament, and which is revealed in characteristics of phrasing. When a great orator makes a great speech you are listening to ten centuries and ten thousand men - but we call it his speech, and really some exceedingly smail portion of it is his. But not enough to signify. It is merely a Waterloo. It is Wellington's battle, in some degree, and we call it his; but there are others that contributed. It takes a thousand men to invent a telegraph, or a steam engine, or a phonograph, or a photograph, or a telephone or any other important thing-and the last man gets the credit and we forget the others. He added his little mite - that is all he did. These object lessons should teach us that ninety-nine parts of all things that proceed from the intellect are plagiarisms, pure and simple; and the lesson ought to make us modest. But nothing can do that.
Letter to Helen Keller, after she had been accused of plagiarism for one of her early stories (17 March 1903), published in Mark Twain's Letters, Vol. 1 (1917) edited by Albert Bigelow Paine, p. 731.
Mark Twain      1903-03-17  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote
about Thomas Paine as quoted in A Literary History of the American People‎ (1931) by Charles Angoff
Abraham Lincoln      Date: unknown  Source vote up this quote facebook share quote tweet this quote

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